Positive Effects on the Environment From Going Green

The green living movement encourages people to live in a more environmentally friendly way, and there are a number of different ways to “go green.” While most people are aware that going green is good for the Earth, they may not fully understand the extent of its impact. Going green has several positive side effects for the environment that contribute to cleaner water and air, preserve natural resources and reduce the impact of global warming.

Reduced Pollution

Going green helps the environment by reducing the amount of pollution that enters the soil, water and air. By using alternative energy sources and avoiding the burning of fossil fuels, recycling and reducing waste and driving more efficiently, fewer pollutants are released into the environment. For example, a study by the Environmental Protection Agency found that air quality in the United States is steadily improving but as of 2008, approximately 127 million Americans still live in areas with potentially hazardous levels of air pollution.

Fewer Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide are thought to be a significant contributing factor to global warming. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that cars produce approximately 1.7 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year. By reducing the amount of time you drive, maintaining your vehicle or driving a green car such as a hybrid, you can help to lower your contribution to the global warming problem.

Resource Conservation

The bulk of the world’s electric power is generated by the burning of fossil fuels, such as oil, coal and natural gas. Burning these types of fuels releases greenhouse gases into the air, and their limited supply makes them unsustainable in the long-term. Reducing energy consumption, using alternative energy sources and recycling reduces the strain on these resources and cuts down on emissions. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that recycling just one plastic bottle conserves enough energy to light a 60-watt light bulb for up to six hours.

Less Waste

Going green encourages people to reduce their consumption, recycle as often as possible and reuse items in an effort to reduce waste. Reducing waste helps the environment by decreasing the amount of material that ends up in landfills, where they can biodegrade and release carbon dioxide which contributes to the greenhouse gas effect. The Environmental Protection Agency also encourages recycling in lieu of incinerating waste, which can release smoke or other potentially harmful pollutants into the air.

Wildlife Preservation

Going green also helps to preserve the habitats of certain species of wild animals. According to Planet Green, approximately 137 plant, animal and insect species become extinct every day due to rainforest deforestation. By reducing your consumption of paper products, buying recycled and recycling whenever possible, you can help to slow the rate of extinction for species that live in wooded areas. Going green also reduces the threat to marine wildlife that dies each year as a result of encountering pollutants or trash in the water supply.

 

how to go green ???

There are 10 ways to go green.. let see..

         Save energy to save money  :

         Save water to save money:

  • Set your thermostat a few degrees lower in the winter and a few degrees higher in the summer to save on heating and cooling costs.
  • Install compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) when your older incandescent bulbs burn out.
  • Unplug appliances when you’re not using them. Or, use a “smart” power strip that senses when appliances are off and cuts “phantom” or “vampire” energy use.
  • Wash clothes in cold water whenever possible. As much as 85 percent of the energy used to machine-wash clothes goes to heating the water.
  • Use a drying rack or clothesline to save the energy otherwise used during machine drying.
  • Take shorter showers to reduce water use. This will lower your water and heating bills too.
  • Install a low-flow showerhead. They don’t cost much, and the water and energy savings can quickly pay back your investment.
  • Make sure you have a faucet aerator on each faucet. These inexpensive appliances conserve heat and water, while keeping water pressure high.
  • Plant drought-tolerant native plants in your garden. Many plants need minimal watering. Find out which occur naturally in your area.

         Less gas = more money (and better health!) :

  • Walk or bike to work. This saves on gas and parking costs while improving your cardiovascular health and reducing your risk of obesity.
  • Consider telecommuting if you live far from your work. Or move closer. Even if this means paying more rent, it could save you money in the long term.
  • Lobby your local government to increase spending on sidewalks and bike lanes. With little cost, these improvements can pay huge dividends in bettering your health and reducing traffic.

         Eat smart :

         Skip the bottled water :

         Think before you buy :

  • Go online to find new or gently used secondhand products. Whether you’ve just moved or are looking to redecorate, consider a service like craigslist or FreeSharing to track down furniture, appliances, and other items cheaply or for free.
  • Check out garage sales, thrift stores, and consignment shops for clothing and other everyday items.
  • When making purchases, make sure you know what’s “Good Stuff” and what isn’t.
  • Watch a video about what happens when you buy things. Your purchases have a real impact, for better or worse.

         Borrow instead of buying :

  • Borrow from libraries instead of buying personal books and movies. This saves money, not to mention the ink and paper that goes into printing new books.
  • Share power tools and other appliances. Get to know your neighbors while cutting down on the number of things cluttering your closet or garage.

         Buy smart :

  • Buy in bulk. Purchasing food from bulk bins can save money and packaging.
  • Wear clothes that don’t need to be dry-cleaned. This saves money and cuts down on toxic chemical use.
  • Invest in high-quality, long-lasting products. You might pay more now, but you’ll be happy when you don’t have to replace items as frequently (and this means less waste!).

         Keep electronics out of the trash :

         Make your own cleaning supplies :

  • The big secret: you can make very effective, non-toxic cleaning products whenever you need them. All you need are a few simple ingredients like baking soda, vinegar, lemon, and soap.
  • Making your own cleaning products saves money, time, and packaging-not to mention your indoor air quality.